Top News in Indonesia

New evidence of ancient rock art across Southeast Asia

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Research on the oldest surviving rock art of Southeast Asia shows the region's first people brought with them a rich art practice. These earliest people skilfully produced paintings of animals in rock shelters from southwest China to Indonesia. Besides these countries, early sites were also recor...

Wide gulf in cancer survival between countries, most comprehensive global study to date shows

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Five-year survival estimates have been published for 25.7 million cancer patients diagnosed with one of 10 common cancers and 75,000 children diagnosed with acute lymphoblastic leukemia between 1995 and 2009, using individual patient data from 279 cancer registries in 67 countries.

Measles Still Kills 400 Kids A Day — And It May Be Making A Comeback

NPR / Nsikan Akpan - - Reading time 3 mins - Share :
The global fight against the disease has stalled, says the World Health Organization. The recession gets some of the blame. And so does the anti-vaccine movement.

Life in Earth’s primordial sea was starved for sulfate

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Earth’s ancient oceans held much lower concentrations of sulfate -- a key biological nutrient -- than previously recognized, according to new research. The findings paint a new portrait of our planet's early biosphere and primitive marine life. Organisms require sulfur as a nutrient, and it pla...

New step towards eradication of H5N1 bird flu

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A University of Adelaide-led project has developed a new test that can distinguish between birds that have been vaccinated against the H5N1 strain of avian influenza virus or "bird flu" with those that have been naturally infected.

Magma pancakes beneath Indonesia's Lake Toba: Subsurface sources of mega-eruptions

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The tremendous amounts of lava that are emitted during super-eruptions accumulate over millions of years prior to the event in the Earth's crust. These reservoirs consist of magma that intrudes into the crust in the form of numerous horizontally oriented sheets resting on top of each other like a...

Unlikely Marriage Of Diseases: TB And Diabetes Form A 'Co-Epidemic'

NPR / Richard Knox - - Reading time 4 mins - Share :
The risk of developing tuberculosis soars when someone has diabetes. The threat of a double pandemic is a challenge for the medical profession, where different docs typically treat each disease.
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Medical Xpress - TB-diabetes co-epidemic looms, experts warn

How Sick Chickens And Rice Led Scientists to Vitamin B1

The Atlantic / Sarah Laskow - - Reading time 2 mins - Share :
The discovery of vitamin B1 began with a search for microbes. In the late 1800s, microbes were the hot new idea in medical science: Louis Pasteur had recently linked disease to germs, and doctors were looking for microscopic explanations for all kinds of ailments. Even when those ailments had not...

One drop will do: Researchers develop simple new test for vitamin B12 deficiency

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A novel method to test for vitamin B12 deficiency that is sensitive enough to work on anyone, including newborn babies and large swaths of the general population, scientists say.
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Top stories: A potential cure for diabetes, Ebola vaccines, and chatty killer whales

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This week's top science news

Global Financing and Long-Term Technical Assistance for Multidrug-Resistant Tuberculosis: Scaling Up Access to Treatment

PLOS Blogs / Thomas J. Hwang et al. - - Reading time 10 mins - Share :
by Thomas J. Hwang, Salmaan Keshavjee

World wakes up to Ebola as cases set to top 1 million

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Only decisive action can stop the virus becoming entrenched in Africa and spreading elsewhere, say epidemiologists

Illegal land clearing for commercial agriculture responsible for half of tropical deforestation

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A comprehensive new analysis says that nearly half of all recent tropical deforestation is the result of illegal clearing for commercial agriculture. The study also finds that the majority of this illegal destruction was driven by overseas demand for agricultural commodities including palm oil, b...

Women, health professionals spark new cycle of improving maternal, newborn health

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Demand for better care by women linked with the expansion of basic services, rather than political pressure, has helped to improve midwifery services in low to middle-income countries, according to international research. An examination of maternal and newborn health systems found that after init...

Timing of food intake could impact effectiveness of TB treatment

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The timing of food intake in the early phase of TB treatment could have a negative impact on the effectiveness of TB treatment. Research suggests that eating food just before taking a TB drug could reduce the effectiveness of the medicine.

Global epidemic of diabetes threatens to jeopardize further progress in tuberculosis control

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15% of adult TB cases worldwide are already attributable to diabetes, studies show. These diabetes-associated cases correspond to over 1 million cases a year, with more than 40% occurring in India and China alone. If diabetes rates continue to rise out of control, the present downward trajectory ...

Fortifying condiments, seasonings for use in countries with widespread micronutrient deficiencies

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Researchers are working to fortify condiments and seasonings for use in countries with widespread micronutrient deficiencies. Micronutrient deficiencies affect the health and cognitive development of at least one-third of the world's population, representing 7.3 percent of all global disease. The...
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Sayur Manis: Delicious, But Also Deadly, Greens From Borneo

NPR / Konstantin Kakaes - - Reading time 4 mins - Share :
Sayur manis is a green vegetable that tastes like spinach with a hint of asparagus when cooked. It's packed with nutrients, but the raw leaves have been linked to outbreaks of lung failure.

Save the children

Nature - - Reading time 2 mins - Share :
Infants and young people are being traumatized by armed conflict in their countries. Their resulting mental illnesses must be addressed, for the good of both the individuals and their society.Nature 512 113 doi: 10.1038/512113a

Common tuberculosis vaccine can be used to prevent infection as well as disease

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None

Flores bones show features of Down syndrome, not a new 'Hobbit' human

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In October 2004, excavation of fragmentary skeletal remains from the island of Flores in Indonesia yielded what was called 'the most important find in human evolution for 100 years.' Its discoverers dubbed the find Homo floresiensis, a name suggesting a previously unknown species of human.

In pictures: One man's HIV campaign

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One man's HIV campaign in Indonesia's Bandung prison

Preventing foodborne illness naturally: with cinnamon

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Cinnamomum cassia oil was shown to be effective as a natural antibacterial agent against several strains of Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli, known to the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention as 'non-O157 STEC'. The study results add to a body of knowledge that will help improve fo...

Can Creativity Be Learned?

The Atlantic / ​Cody C. Delistraty - - Reading time 11 mins - Share :
At 2 a.m. on June 16, 1816, Mary Wollstonecraft Godwin awoke with a fright. Mary was 18 years old and spending her summer at the Villa Diodati at Lake Geneva with her stepsister Claire Clairmont and the writers Lord Byron and John William Polidori. Her future husband, Percy Shelley, was staying n...

Conditions linked to deadly bird flu revealed: High risk areas identified

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A dangerous strain of avian influenza, H7N9, that's causing severe illness and deaths in China may be inhabiting a small fraction of its potential range and appears at risk of spreading to other suitable areas of India, Bangladesh, Vietnam, Indonesia and the Philippines, according to a new study.

Avian flu could strike Asian poultry markets outside China

Science News / Tina Hesman Saey - - Reading time < 1 mins - Share :
H7N9 influenza has a higher chance of spreading to humans in urban areas close to water, researchers predict.

Forest loss starves fish

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Research shows forest debris that drains into lakes is an important contributor to freshwater food chains – bolstering fish diets to the extent that increased forest cover causes fish to get ‘fat’ and sparse forest leaves smaller, underfed fish.

The Lancet: Most comprehensive global study to date shows obesity rates climbing worldwide

(e) Science News - - Reading time 4 mins - Share :
Worldwide, there has been a startling increase in rates of obesity and overweight in both adults (28% increase) and children (up by 47%) in the past 33 years, with the number of overweight and obese people rising from 857 million in 1980 to 2.1 billion in 2013, according to a major new analysis f...

Obesity rates climbing worldwide, most comprehensive global study to date shows

ScienceDaily - - Reading time 3 mins - Share :
Worldwide, there has been a startling increase in rates of obesity and overweight in both adults (28% increase) and children (up by 47%) in the past 33 years, with the number of overweight and obese people rising from 857 million in 1980 to 2.1 billion in 2013, according to a major new analysis. ...

Child deaths drop by 48% globally since 1990

Futurity / Rhonda Stewart-U. Washington - - Reading time 4 mins - Share :
Since the start of an international effort to address child and maternal mortality in 1990, child deaths have been cut in half and maternal deaths have been reduced by almost a quarter, a new study shows. In 2000, the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) were established by the United Nations to d...

New WTO challenge to Australia plain-packaging tobacco law

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A battle against Australia's plain tobacco packaging rules gained pace at the World Trade Organization on Wednesday, as Indonesia won the right to seek a ruling by the global body.

Indonesia's competitiveness at risk from neglected diseases of poverty

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Indonesia has seen impressive economic and development growth. Sustaining these gains, however, may not be possible without aggressively addressing neglected tropical diseases, which affect the majority of Indonesians. Neglected tropical diseases are 'one of the most potent forces' of extreme pov...

Indonesia's competitiveness at risk from neglected diseases of poverty

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February 27, 2014 – The control and elimination of neglected tropical diseases (NTDs) is one of the most cost-effective ways Indonesia can sustain economic growth and reduce inequality, said scientists today in an analysis published in PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases. While Indonesia is poised...

Milk research examines the intersection among consumer culture, agriculture, and public health

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The granddaughter of a Midwestern dairy farmer, Kendra Smith-Howard spent her summers scooping ice cream cones for Uncle Bob's Homemade Ice Cream. But as a college student, she pursued greater adventures – working as a park ranger in Montana's Glacier National Park, and teaching and studying in...

Make childbirth safer in Indonesia: Report

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A joint report by US and Indonesian experts provides recommendations to improve the survival of mothers and newborns in Indonesia. That nation, a rising power, must invest in medical infrastructure including facilities and transportation, according to the report.

NAS report: Make childbirth safer in Indonesia

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Indonesia is a fast-rising economic power that has made significant progress toward key development goals including reducing child mortality. But for reasons outlined in a National Academy of Sciences report by U.S. and Indonesian experts, the nation's estimated rates of maternal and neonatal mor...

Mysterious ancient human crossed Wallace's Line

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Scientists have proposed that the most recently discovered ancient human relatives – the Denisovans – somehow managed to cross one of the world’s most prominent marine barriers in Indonesia, and later interbred with modern humans moving through the area on the way to Australia and New Guinea.

How can vaccination be improved to eradicate avian influenza H5N1 in Indonesia?

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To answer this question, Okti Nadia Poetri researched the effect of vaccination to stop the spread of avian influenza in Indonesia. On January 21 Poetri will defence her thesis of this research.Highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) also known as 'bird flu', is considered to be a major threat t...

GlaxoSmithKline hails drug pipeline after 2013's China scandal

The Guardian / Jennifer Rankin - - Reading time 2 mins - Share :
UK pharmaceutical company said it had 10 promising drugs and vaccines in late-stage developmentGlaxoSmithKline has heralded the most productive year ever for its scientists, as it seeks to draw a line under a massive corruption scandal in China.GSK, one of the UK's largest companies, announced it...

Yaws eradication will need millions of donated antibiotics, says WHO

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World Health Organisation says bacterial skin disease requires drug companies to give large supplies of single-dose tabletsThe World Health Organisation has stepped up efforts to eradicate yaws, described as the "forgotten disease", after the discovery of a single-dose oral antibiotic that can cu...